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Arnhild Leggett, 63, of Zweibrücken, receives her flu shot Friday at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. With winter fast approaching, flu shots drew hundreds of people to Landstuhl’s health fair, where visitors also learned about various agencies there, including family practice, pharmacy, dental and retiree services.
Arnhild Leggett, 63, of Zweibrücken, receives her flu shot Friday at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. With winter fast approaching, flu shots drew hundreds of people to Landstuhl’s health fair, where visitors also learned about various agencies there, including family practice, pharmacy, dental and retiree services. (Seth Robbins/Stars and Stripes)
Arnhild Leggett, 63, of Zweibrücken, receives her flu shot Friday at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. With winter fast approaching, flu shots drew hundreds of people to Landstuhl’s health fair, where visitors also learned about various agencies there, including family practice, pharmacy, dental and retiree services.
Arnhild Leggett, 63, of Zweibrücken, receives her flu shot Friday at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. With winter fast approaching, flu shots drew hundreds of people to Landstuhl’s health fair, where visitors also learned about various agencies there, including family practice, pharmacy, dental and retiree services. (Seth Robbins/Stars and Stripes)
Paula Balderston, who works for the New Parent Support Program at Pulaski Barracks, demonstrates a doll that teaches new parents about the devastating effects of shaking an infant. The red flashing lights represent damage to the child’s brain. Balderston, who teaches classes to new parents, was one of dozens of experts from different departments who offered information at a health fair Friday at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany.
Paula Balderston, who works for the New Parent Support Program at Pulaski Barracks, demonstrates a doll that teaches new parents about the devastating effects of shaking an infant. The red flashing lights represent damage to the child’s brain. Balderston, who teaches classes to new parents, was one of dozens of experts from different departments who offered information at a health fair Friday at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. (Seth Robbins/Stars and Stripes)

With winter fast approaching, flu shots drew hundreds of visitors to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center’s health fair Friday. The health fair, held in the Learning Resource Center, not only provided visitors the opportunity to get their seasonal influenza vaccine, but also the chance to have their blood pressure checked, vision and hearing tested, and teeth screened. Also on hand were experts from more than a dozen agencies, including family practice, the traumatic brain injury division and the wellness center, among others. At one booth, Paula Balderston demonstrated a doll that shows the devastating effects of shaking an infant. When the doll is shaken, red lights flash that represent damage to the brain. It also cries incessantly, to give its handlers an idea of the decibel level that a baby can reach. Robertson, who works for the New Parent Support Program at Pulaski Barracks, teaches classes, which offer tips on how to soothe an inconsolable newborn. One tip, she said, is to swaddle, or tightly wrap, the baby in a blanket. She said new parents should not blame themselves for not being able to comfort their baby. It’s not their fault,” she said. “Some infants go through a period of inconsolable crying at 2 to 4 months.”

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