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Models demonstrate Microsoft's Kinect during the Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe. To be released in November, Kinect is a peripheral for Xbox 360 console that uses no controller but detects motion and spoken commands.
Models demonstrate Microsoft's Kinect during the Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe. To be released in November, Kinect is a peripheral for Xbox 360 console that uses no controller but detects motion and spoken commands. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
Models demonstrate Microsoft's Kinect during the Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe. To be released in November, Kinect is a peripheral for Xbox 360 console that uses no controller but detects motion and spoken commands.
Models demonstrate Microsoft's Kinect during the Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe. To be released in November, Kinect is a peripheral for Xbox 360 console that uses no controller but detects motion and spoken commands. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
Gamers packed Makuhari Messe on Saturday during the Tokyo Game Show. The show gave visitors a chance to try out new video games. The annual show, which drew more than 180,000 over four days, is the largest video game event in the world.
Gamers packed Makuhari Messe on Saturday during the Tokyo Game Show. The show gave visitors a chance to try out new video games. The annual show, which drew more than 180,000 over four days, is the largest video game event in the world. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
A girl tries out Poupee girl 2 by Sega on Saturday at the annual Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe. Poupee, which means doll in French, allows players to create avatars and dress them up and enter a fashion contest.
A girl tries out Poupee girl 2 by Sega on Saturday at the annual Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe. Poupee, which means doll in French, allows players to create avatars and dress them up and enter a fashion contest. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
A photographer takes a photo of a cosplayer at the Tokyo Game Show. Cosplayers, who dress up as their favorite video game or animation character, are one of the attractions at the annual event.
A photographer takes a photo of a cosplayer at the Tokyo Game Show. Cosplayers, who dress up as their favorite video game or animation character, are one of the attractions at the annual event. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
A crowd lines up to play a video game Saturday during the Tokyo Game Show. The highlight of the annual event is the public gets a chance to play pre-released games. Waiting time for some popular games was over three hours.
A crowd lines up to play a video game Saturday during the Tokyo Game Show. The highlight of the annual event is the public gets a chance to play pre-released games. Waiting time for some popular games was over three hours. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
Microsoft's Kinect is displayed at annual Tokyo Game Show. To be released in November, Kinect is a peripheral for Xbox 360 console that uses no controller but detects people's motion and spoken commands to control the games.
Microsoft's Kinect is displayed at annual Tokyo Game Show. To be released in November, Kinect is a peripheral for Xbox 360 console that uses no controller but detects people's motion and spoken commands to control the games. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
A visitor tries out Sony?s PlayStation Move and 3D game Saturday during Tokyo Game Show Saturday. As one of highlights of the show, Move, a controller for PlayStation 3 that uses motion sensors to control the games, was available for visitors to try before its October release in Japan.
A visitor tries out Sony?s PlayStation Move and 3D game Saturday during Tokyo Game Show Saturday. As one of highlights of the show, Move, a controller for PlayStation 3 that uses motion sensors to control the games, was available for visitors to try before its October release in Japan. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
Visitors at the Tokyo Game Show got a chance to try out the latest in video games.
Visitors at the Tokyo Game Show got a chance to try out the latest in video games. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
Cosplayers pose for photos Sept. 18 at Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe on Saturday. Cosplayers, which is short for costume players, dress up as their favorite video game or animation characters and are one of the attractions at the annual event.
Cosplayers pose for photos Sept. 18 at Tokyo Game Show held at Makuhari Messe on Saturday. Cosplayers, which is short for costume players, dress up as their favorite video game or animation characters and are one of the attractions at the annual event. (Hana Kusumoto/Stars and Stripes)
A visitor to the Tokyo Game Show 2010 tries out the new PlayStation Move motion controller on Saturday.
A visitor to the Tokyo Game Show 2010 tries out the new PlayStation Move motion controller on Saturday. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
This man ? dressed as Street Fighter character E. Honda ? was many of the side attractions visitors to the Tokyo Game Show 2010 found Saturday. Officials said they had a record-setting number of visitors ? 207,647 ? during the four-day show.
This man ? dressed as Street Fighter character E. Honda ? was many of the side attractions visitors to the Tokyo Game Show 2010 found Saturday. Officials said they had a record-setting number of visitors ? 207,647 ? during the four-day show. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Gamers pack the Tokyo Game Show 2010 exhibition Saturday in the Makuhari Messe convention center in Chiba, Japan. Officials said the four-day show drew a record-setting number of visitors -- 207,647.
Gamers pack the Tokyo Game Show 2010 exhibition Saturday in the Makuhari Messe convention center in Chiba, Japan. Officials said the four-day show drew a record-setting number of visitors -- 207,647. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Visitors try out some new video games at the Tokyo Game Show 2010 at Chiba Prefecture's Makuhari Messe convention center on Saturday.
Visitors try out some new video games at the Tokyo Game Show 2010 at Chiba Prefecture's Makuhari Messe convention center on Saturday. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
A young gamer samples one of PlayStation's new 3-D titles Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010 held at Chiba Prefecture's Makuhari Messe convention center.
A young gamer samples one of PlayStation's new 3-D titles Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010 held at Chiba Prefecture's Makuhari Messe convention center. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Actors portraying characters from Sega's upcoming game 'Yakuza of the End' were on hand Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010.
Actors portraying characters from Sega's upcoming game 'Yakuza of the End' were on hand Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
A gamer takes Gran Turismo 5 out for a spin Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010.
A gamer takes Gran Turismo 5 out for a spin Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Many of the fans at the Tokyo Game Show 2010 came in costume on Saturday, including these young Japanese women.
Many of the fans at the Tokyo Game Show 2010 came in costume on Saturday, including these young Japanese women. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
A gamer tries his hand at figure skating with the X-Box 360 Kinect controller Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010.
A gamer tries his hand at figure skating with the X-Box 360 Kinect controller Saturday at the Tokyo Game Show 2010. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Two visitors to the Tokyo Game Show 2010 jump Saturday while playing Kinect Adventures, a to-be-released game for the new X-Box 360.
Two visitors to the Tokyo Game Show 2010 jump Saturday while playing Kinect Adventures, a to-be-released game for the new X-Box 360. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Fans wear 3-D glasses while they check out a collection of PlayStation 3 games to be released throughout the year.
Fans wear 3-D glasses while they check out a collection of PlayStation 3 games to be released throughout the year. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)
Crowds at this year's Tokyo Game Show were treated to a number of preview video and presentations for upcoming game titles and peripherals coming out next year.
Crowds at this year's Tokyo Game Show were treated to a number of preview video and presentations for upcoming game titles and peripherals coming out next year. (Grant Okubo/Stars and Stripes)

It was Christmas in September for gaming fans as a record crowd of 207,000 swarmed to the Tokyo Game Show.

Held Sept. 16-19 at Chiba prefecture’s Makuhari Messe convention center, the annual show offered visitors the chance to play some of the 712 games on display by the 194 companies on hand.

And they were lined up to get their chance.

“It seemed like there were more people this year,” said C.C. Giscombe, a military dependant at Yokota Air Base, Japan. “When we got here, there were crowds wrapped around in front.”

“I’m surprised so many people showed up just for games,” said Daisuke Watanabe, 21, of Tokyo, who came to Tokyo Game Show for the first time.

Although the games were the top draw, there were plenty of side attractions, including the scantly clad “booth babes” who demonstrated games and assisted gamers.

Sony Computer Entertainment and Microsoft Game Studios each gave people a chance to check out their new motion-based controllers.

Microsoft showed off the Kinect, which takes the controller out of the player’s hand and uses a camera that reads gestures and transforms them into movement on the Xbox 360. During a keynote address on the first day of the event, Microsoft’s corporate vice president Phil Spencer discussed the important influence of Japanese game developers and announced a new partnership with five who are all developing games for the Kinect.

Sony responded with showing off both the Move motion controller and a collection of its upcoming 3-D titles. The Move used a handheld wand, similar to Nintendo’s Wii temote, but instead used the PlayStation Eye camera to track the wand’s position.

Some people waited in lines for up to three hours to try out the Kinect. The wait wasn’t as long for the Move, as Sony provided a lot more booths.

The Move is already available but Kinect doesn’t come out until November.

Giscombe, an avid gamer, isn’t completely sold on the new controllers.

“As a gamer I still like the controller and the game pads,” she said.

Kaori Hamamura, 21, of Tokyo, was impressed with the Kinect. “I went to see it and it looked fun,” she said. “But I’m going to wait and see since there aren’t so many games out for it yet.”

Stars and Stripes reporter Hana Kusumoto contributed to this story.

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