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David Ignatius

David Ignatius has covered almost every Washington beat from the Pentagon to the CIA to Capitol Hill. His reporting and commentary, syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group, draw on his network of resources to uncover and break news. He also has published eight novels.


New space race focus: Who will lead on warfare?

The Air Force’s best argument for retaining primacy is that it’s ready to take risks, and even tolerate failures, in building the systems that will quickly reduce U.S. vulnerability.

The consequences of a strike on Syria

The trick for U.S. planners is how to calibrate military action this time so that it sends a clear deterrence message to Syria and Russia without escalating the conflict.

Internet has a bigger problem than Facebook fiasco

The internet fosters a “post-truth” era. The public doesn’t want its biases to be challenged these days, but affirmed.


OPINION

Snapshots of GIs on the front lines of Syria

I can’t help thinking that there’s something about this mission — which has been low cost and high success, according to commanders — that Trump doesn’t understand.


Raqqa rubble a reminder of US military might

Washington Post Writers Group


The rise of Saudi Arabia's young prince casts a shadow over the Middle East

In the early hours of Wednesday, Saudi Arabia's King Salman elevated his 31-year-old son to be the kingdom's crown prince, replacing the king's 57-year-old nephew, Mohammed bin Nayef. The formal ascension of Mohammed bin Salman establishes the young royal as the most important political figure in the country, given the widespread suggestions that his father is ailing and infirm.


NSA links cyberattack to Pyongyang

The assessment, which was issued internally last week and has not been made public, is based on an analysis of tactics, techniques and targets that point with "moderate confidence" to North Korea's spy agency, the Reconnaissance General Bureau.

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  • OPINION

    New space race focus: Who will lead on warfare?

    The Air Force’s best argument for retaining primacy is that it’s ready to take risks, and even tolerate failures, in building the systems that will quickly reduce U.S. vulnerability.


  • OPINION

    The consequences of a strike on Syria

    The trick for U.S. planners is how to calibrate military action this time so that it sends a clear deterrence message to Syria and Russia without escalating the conflict.


  • OPINION

    Internet has a bigger problem than Facebook fiasco

    The internet fosters a “post-truth” era. The public doesn’t want its biases to be challenged these days, but affirmed.


  • OPINION

    Snapshots of GIs on the front lines of Syria

    I can’t help thinking that there’s something about this mission — which has been low cost and high success, according to commanders — that Trump doesn’t understand.


  • Raqqa rubble a reminder of US military might

    Washington Post Writers Group


  • The rise of Saudi Arabia's young prince casts a shadow over the Middle East

    In the early hours of Wednesday, Saudi Arabia's King Salman elevated his 31-year-old son to be the kingdom's crown prince, replacing the king's 57-year-old nephew, Mohammed bin Nayef. The formal ascension of Mohammed bin Salman establishes the young royal as the most important political figure in the country, given the widespread suggestions that his father is ailing and infirm.


  • NSA links cyberattack to Pyongyang

    The assessment, which was issued internally last week and has not been made public, is based on an analysis of tactics, techniques and targets that point with "moderate confidence" to North Korea's spy agency, the Reconnaissance General Bureau.

see more
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