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The U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigation Command, also known as CID, is looking for a few good “G Men,” according to an Army news release.

CID special agents investigate crimes, provide protection for Defense Department and Army leaders, and work with other federal and local law enforcement agencies to solve crimes, the release stated. The command even has an airborne detachment at Fort Bragg, N.C.

Soldiers who are qualified to become CID agents receive training at the U.S. Army Military Police School and advanced training in a range of specialized investigative disciplines, including polygraphs, counter-narcotics, economic-crime investigations and computer crime, according to the release.

Investigators also have the opportunity to receive advanced training at the FBI National Academy, the Canadian Police College, and at George Washington University, where they can earn a master’s degree in forensic science.

“It’s a tremendous opportunity for soldiers to become one of the DOD’s premier law enforcement agents and receive some of the best training in the world,” Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Misianowycz was quoted as saying in the release. “We are always looking for qualified prospects to join CID.”

Law-enforcement experience is not a requirement to join CID, according to Marianne Goden, chief of CID’s accreditation division. The agency offers a six-month internship program for soldiers who lack the law-enforcement experience, according to the release.

Among the requirements necessary to become a CID special agent, soldiers must be a U.S. citizen, at least 21 years old; an E-5 or below with at least two years of service and not more than 10; have a general technical score of at least 110 or higher; have 60 semester hours of college credit and have no court-martial convictions.

For a complete list of requirements, go to the CID Web site, located at www.cid.army.mil.

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