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Spc. Austin Garrett, infantryman, Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, employs a hand grenade during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge.
Spc. Austin Garrett, infantryman, Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, employs a hand grenade during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge. (1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Inf)
Spc. Austin Garrett, infantryman, Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, employs a hand grenade during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge.
Spc. Austin Garrett, infantryman, Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, employs a hand grenade during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge. (1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Inf)
Staff Sgt. Angel Sigetti, infantry squad leader, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, moves under simulated direct fire during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge.
Staff Sgt. Angel Sigetti, infantry squad leader, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, moves under simulated direct fire during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge. (1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Inf)
Pfc. Kyle Ishikawa, infantryman, Company A, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, practices first aid on an open head wound during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge.
Pfc. Kyle Ishikawa, infantryman, Company A, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, practices first aid on an open head wound during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 15, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge. (1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Inf)
Soldiers of the 4th Infantry Division march 12 miles through a snowstorm during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 18, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge.
Soldiers of the 4th Infantry Division march 12 miles through a snowstorm during Expert Infantryman Badge evaluations on March 18, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge. (1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division)
Col. Curtis D. Taylor, commander, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, awards 33 "True Blue" soldiers with an Army Commendation Medal during an Expert Infantryman Badge ceremony on March 18, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge.
Col. Curtis D. Taylor, commander, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, awards 33 "True Blue" soldiers with an Army Commendation Medal during an Expert Infantryman Badge ceremony on March 18, 2016. The Army is planning to revamp evaluations for the badge. (1st Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division)
A soldier with the 4th Infantry Division wears his Expert Infantryman Badge during an EIB award ceremony on March 18, 2016.
A soldier with the 4th Infantry Division wears his Expert Infantryman Badge during an EIB award ceremony on March 18, 2016. (U.S. Army photo)

The Army is planning to rewrite the book on its Expert Infantryman Badge by September.

Soldiers in a pilot program at Fort Benning, Ga., recently tested changes to the requirements for the badge, which include revamps of proficiency on indirect fire, moving under fire, grenade use and medical care under fire.

“Their feedback was really essential to rolling out this new standard, making sure it was validated before it hit the horse,” Master Sgt. Charles Evans, from the Office of the Chief of the Infantry, said in an Army statement Monday. “Just working out all the kinks and making sure that all the tasks were applicable, realistic and up to date with the latest doctrine.”

Most of the changes are aimed at better standardizing the test, the statement said.

Soldiers vying for the EIB must execute 30 tasks — 10 each on weapons, patrolling and medical care.

The new badge manual is expected to be completed by this year’s first EIB event at Fort Benning in September, the Army said.

In 1944, Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall began development of the EIB award to honor the role played by infantryman in combat.

The EIB testing process measures the mastery of individual skills over a five-day period.

Every EIB candidate must pass an Army physical fitness test with a minimum score of 80 percent in each event, a day and night land navigation course and then spend three days rotating through the test’s 30 consecutive stations.

Only 14 percent of soldiers tested earn the EIB, according to the U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence.

howard.william@stripes.com Twitter: @Howard_Stripes

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