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In competition for Navy trademarks, it’s Padres 1, baby diapers 0

From left, San Diego Padres manager Andy Green; outfielder Wil Myers; Capt. Craig Clapperton, commanding officer of aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt; pitcher James Shields; San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer; and Padres president Mike Dee pose on the Roosevelt’s flight deck Dec. 1, 2015, during the unveiling of the team’s new Navy-inspired uniform.
<br>Joseph S. Yu/ U.S. Navy photo
From left, San Diego Padres manager Andy Green; outfielder Wil Myers; Capt. Craig Clapperton, commanding officer of aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt; pitcher James Shields; San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer; and Padres president Mike Dee pose on the Roosevelt’s flight deck Dec. 1, 2015, during the unveiling of the team’s new Navy-inspired uniform.

San Diego Padres pitcher James Shields and outfielder Wil Myers will dress as the Navy boys of summer during some Sunday home games this season at Petco Park.

The pair will be sporting jerseys using the Navy’s “blueberries” camouflage digital pattern, which the service officially calls Navy Working Uniform Type 1.

The Padres recently received permission to use the pattern from the Navy Trademark Licensing Office, which is headquartered at the Office of Naval Research in Arlington, Va.

The team unveiled the new Sunday jerseys in December 2015 on the flight deck of the carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt at Naval Air Station North Island, located across San Diego Bay from Petco Park.
The Padres home opener is April 4, with its first Sunday home game slated for April 17.

Replicas of the Navy camouflage jerseys will be sold in the team store, and a portion of each sale goes to the Navy, according to a Navy news release.

“The past few seasons, the Padres honored the Marine Corps," said Nadine Villanueva Santiago, manager of the Navy Trademark Licensing Office, in the Navy release. “The team decided to honor another service, and the Navy was a perfect fit due to its strong presence in the area. When the Padres reached out to us, we thought it would be an excellent opportunity to spotlight the Navy.”

Many less-than-excellent requests are made to Santiago’s office for permission to use Navy trademarks.
“We’ve received requests to put Navy logos on the bottoms of baby diapers,” said Santiago. “It’s a cute idea, but, as you can imagine, we refused to approve those requests.”
 

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