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Iceland
Hardy Icelandic horses take tourists through Iceland's rugged terrain. Brought by the Vikings to Iceland as early as 874, the breed is a mixture of Norwegian horses and Shetland, Highland and Connemara ponies.<br>Courtesy of Ishestar Riding Tour

Two days in Reykjavik: Horseback riding, lagoon swimming and not enough time

My husband and I had only two days in Iceland, and we were determined to make the best of it — foul weather or not.

Fishing, whale-watching and boating are popular activities around the island. The marina is filled with boats of all types.<br>Jennifer L. Price / Special to S&S

Iceland: Warm up to it in winter

Many consider a trip to Iceland in the winter a crazy idea. They say it is cold, dark and expensive. All true. But it is also a unique and dynamic vacation destination — and going in the winter is not all that crazy.

A golfer at the Shagrila course in Iceland takes a shot from the fish hazard.<br>Merle Hunter/Stars and Stripes

FROM THE STARS AND STRIPES ARCHIVES

Golf in Iceland: fraught with hazards

There are no sandtraps in Shangrila, but par is about as elusive as it is in Pinehurst. If this strikes you as dogma, then you should consult those hardy sportsmen who have sampled the snares and the gremlins which haunt the U.S. Navy's notorious nine holes in Iceland.

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