Quantcast
Advertisement

GALLERY

On the hunt for the coveted Expert Field Medical Badge

Sgt. Willard Wilson, a member of the U.S. Army's Bavaria Dental Activity, demonstrates how to pull a casualty on a rescue stretcher on Sept. 11, 2013, for candidates hoping to earn the Army Expert Field Medical Badge at Grafenwöhr Training Area in Germany.

More than 260 American, British and Belgian servicemembers began testing last week in Grafenwöhr, Germany, to earn the U.S. Army’s Expert Field Medical Badge. By Monday afternoon, with a written test and a 12-mile ruck march left to go, the field had been whittled down to about 60.

Each year, between 5 percent and 25 percent of candidates pass qualification for the EFMB, making it one of the toughest badges to earn in the U.S. military. It rates just below the Combat Medical Badge, earned for medical support to a ground unit engaged in combat, and is considered the medical equivalent of the Expert Infantryman Badge. Of the 262 military personnel who began the hunt for the Army’s coveted Expert Field Medical Badge last week in Grafenwöhr, Germany, 47 finished, passing the final event — a 12-mile ruck march — early Tuesday morning.

Though it is an Army decoration, members of other services are often invited to participate in EFMB qualifications. In Europe, qualification sometimes includes foreign medical personnel as well. This year, nine participants from the United Kingdom and Belgium took part, along with more than 250 U.S. servicemembers.


This is a preview of content that is currently available to Stars and Stripes Tablet Edition readersSubscribers enjoy first access to the latest feature stories, exclusive photo galleries and more. The iPad app offers a free 7-day preview and then three convenient and low-priced subscription plans. Read more about the Stars and Stripes Tablet Edition or download it for free from the App Store today.

Join the conversation and share your voice.

Show Comments

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement