Quantcast
Advertisement

GALLERY

Inside the DMZ

A North Korean soldier looks toward Freedom House at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. North Korean and United Nation Command soldiers maintain a 24-hour watch on each other.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A North Korean soldier looks toward Freedom House at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. North Korean and United Nation Command soldiers maintain a 24-hour watch on each other.
United Nations Command Checkpoint 4 sits empty near the Bridge of No Return at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. Due to the closeness of a heavily armed North Korean checkpoint on the other side, the UNC checkpoint is left unmanned.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
The North Korean flag flies high above the blue roof buildings in Kijongdong, North Korea, May 28, 2014.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A North Korean observation tower in the Korean Demilitarized Zone on May 28, 2014. North Korea and United Nations Command keep a 24-hour watchful eye on each other in the DMZ.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
Members of the United Nations Command Security Battalion stand guard at the Joint Security Area on May 28, 2014.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
The North Korean flag flies high above the blue roof buildings in Kijongdong, North Korea, May 28, 2014. Kijongdong, also known as Propaganda Village, is home of the third tallest flagpole at 525 feet.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A North Korean tractor chugs along near a rice field at Kijongdong, North Korea, on May 28, 2014. Kijongdong, also known as Propaganda Village, is the only North Korean village permitted in the DMZ.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
The Axe Murder Incident monument at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
The Bridge of No Return is seen at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. The bridge was where 2 major prisoner-of-war exchanges took place after the Korean War cease-fire in 1953.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
The brassard worn by members of the United Nations Command Security Battalion at the Joint Security Area.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
North Korea farmers working at a rice field at Kijongdong, North Korea, on May 28, 2014. Kijongdong, also known as Propaganda Village, is the only North Korean village permitted in the DMZ.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A cement slab marking the border North and South Korea sits just outside the United Nations Command Military Armistice Commission Conference Building at the Joint Security Area.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A member of the United Nations Command Security Battalion stands guard  inside the U.N. Command Military Armistice Commission Conference Building at the Joint Security Area on May 28, 2014. The building is infrequently used by North Korea and the UNC to communicate with each other.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A member of the United Nations Command Security Battalion stands ready beside the North Korean entrance inside the UNC Military Armistice Commission Conference Building at the Joint Security Area, on May 28, 2014.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A piece of the tree stump from the infamous axe murder incident sits at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. In 1976, North Korean soldiers attacked a United Nations Command security team and a group of Korean Service Corps personnel that were cutting down a tree that blocked the line of sight between a UNC checkpoint and observation post. The attack led to the deaths of U.S. Army officers Capt. Arthur Bonifas and 1st Lt. Mark Barrett.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A member of the United Nations Command Security Battalion, foreground, looks toward the Panmungak building at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A model of the Korean Demilitarized Zone at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. The JSA can be seen to the right, with alternating red and blue lights show the line of contact where the two opposing forces stopped fighting.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
A model replica of the Axe Murder Incident is on display at the Joint Security Area, South Korea, on May 28, 2014. North Korean soldiers attacked a United Nations Command security team and a group of Korean Service Corps personnel that were cutting down a tree that blocked the line of sight between a UNC checkpoint and observation post. The attack led to the deaths of U.S. Army officers Capt. Arthur Bonifas and 1st Lt. Mark Barrett.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes
South Korean soldiers stand at an observation post not far from the Korean Demilitarized Zone on May 28, 2014. Observation posts as these are common along the Han River to watch for a potential North Korean infiltration and assault.<br>Armando R. Limon/Stars and Stripes

PANMUNJOM, South Korea — The Korean Demilitarized Zone remains one of the world’s most heavily guarded borders.

For more than 40 years, the Joint Security Area at Panmunjon has remained the focal point for official communications between North and South Korea. The JSA sits at the point where the Korean War came to a close, with both sides forbidden to have military formations within 2 kilometers of the area.

Each country has one village inside the DMZ: Kijongdong in the north and Daeseongdong in the south.

For decades, South Korean authorities denied civilian access to the area, but now it has become a tourist attraction.

limon.armando@stripes.com
 

Join the conversation and share your voice.

Show Comments

Advertisement
Editors' picks

Some other top stories on stripes.com.

Advertisement

 

Advertisement