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Hurricane 12E (Ignacio), # 3

Ignacio one of three tropical cyclones roiling in the eastern Pacific; Hawaii could feel effects in next few days.

2:30 a.m. Monday, Aug. 31, Hawaii time: With every passing update, it looks more and more as if Hurricane Ignacio may threaten Hawaii less and less. The National Weather Service has discontinued a tropical storm watch, stating tropical storm-force winds were no longer expected to reach the islands.

Ignacio continues diminishing as it heads northwest, and is now due to pass 260 miles northeast of Hilo on the Big Island at about 10 p.m. Monday, and 260 miles northeast of Camp H.M. Smith on Oahu and 300 miles northeast of Barking Sands on Kauai between 9 p.m. Tuesday and 8 a.m. Wednesday as a Category 1 hurricane.

Typhoon 17W (Atsani), # 13 FINAL

5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 23, Japan time: Typhoon Atsani has a few more days of life left in it, but it most likely won’t threaten any land masses if it remains on its current Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast track. Atsani has curved northeast, it remains well away from any land masses and is forecast to die out late in the week over the north Pacific Ocean. Unless something changes, this is the last update on Typhoon Atsani.


7:15 a.m. Friday, Aug. 21, Japan time: Atsani has been downgraded to a Category 3-equivalent typhoon and remains forecast to curve northeast, well out of range of the Tokyo-Kanto Plain area, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Tropical Storm 16W (Goni), # 40 FINAL

11:15 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 25, Japan time: Goni has been downgraded to a tropical storm and is diminishing as it heads north through the Sea of Japan (East Sea) toward Vladivostok and secondary landfall early Thursday morning, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Unless Goni drastically shifts course, this will be the final update on Tropical Storm Goni.


UPDATED 11 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 25, Japan time: Sasebo Naval Base and its properties have entered all-clear/seasonal Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness 4, according to Fleet Activities Sasebo’s official Facebook page. Safe to venture outdoors, but also time to get back to work. Transportation servies (blue bus, Hario Shuttle, drivers to/from airports) should resume sometime Tuesday afternoon, though some highways remain closed in the area.

Tropical cyclone formation alerts issued east of Guam

8:30 a.m. Friday, Aug. 14, Guam time: Two tropical cyclone formation alerts have been issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center on a pair of tropical disturbances, one just east of Guam, the other in the Marshall Islands. Both are forecast to develop over the next couple of days. Too soon to say what impact the one near Guam might have. PST will keep an eye out for further development.

Tropical Storm 10E (Hilda), # 2 FINAL

Hilda remains a Category 1 hurricane for the moment, but is forecast to diminish as it heads northwest toward Hawaii, where it’s expected to pass south of the island group with low impact.

9:45 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 11, Hawaii time: Hilda has been downgraded to a tropical storm by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, has continued on a westward track that began Monday and is now forecast to miss the Hawaiian Islands well to the south. Hilda is projected to pass 173 miles south of Hilo on the Big Island at about 11 a.m. Thursday as a tropical depression. Unless it resumes a northwest track toward Hawaii, this should be PST’s final update on Tropical Storm Hilda.


Noon Monday, Aug. 10, Hawaii time: Hilda remains a Category 1 hurricane for the moment, but is forecast to diminish as it heads northwest toward Hawaii, where it’s expected to pass south of the island group with low impact.

Tropical Storm 15W (Molave), #5 FINAL

4:45 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 12, Japan time: Molave has re-intensified into a tropical storm and should peak at 58-mph sustained winds and 75-mph gusts late Wednesday. But it has picked up forward speed and continues tracking northeast away from Japan, at a 16-mph clip as of noon Thursday. Unless it makes a sudden shift toward land, this should be PST’s final update on Tropical Storm Molave.


6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 11, Japan time: Well, so much for final updates on Molave, which regenerated into a tropical storm and is forecast to reach Category 1-equivalent typhoon strength late Thursday afternoon. The good news is, Molave is churning northeast, away from Japan’s main island of Honshu, and at this point is no threat to land. PST will continue to eyeball it.


Tropical Storm 09E (Guillermo), #10

Tropical Storm Guillermo on Aug. 3, 2015.

6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 6, Hawaii time: Guillermo has been downgraded to a tropical depression and has begun tracking west after edging closer to the Hawaiian islands, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

At 4 p.m., Guilermo was 131 miles north of Hilo on the Big Island, heading west at 5 mph. A high-surf warning and a tropical storm watch have been issued for coastal waters off both islands. No watches or warnings are in effect for land.

Typhoon 13W (Soudelor), #26 FINAL

Super Typhoon Soudelor on Aug. 3, 2015.

8:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, Japan time: U.S. bases on Okinawa have reverted to seasonal Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness 4. Winds and the chance of rain are diminishing on island. Okinawa got some trace amounts of rain due to isolated showers, not enough to make a dent after the relatively dry rainy season. Soudelor is still on track for landfall over Taiwan later Saturday morning and over China late Saturday evening. This should be PST’s final update on Soudelor.


1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 7, Japan time: Soudelor has made its closest point of approach to Okinawa, 342 miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base at 9 a.m. Friday, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Tropical Depression 01C (Halola), # 60 FINAL

Sasebo issues TCCOR Storm Watch; Halola deteriorating, forecast to track just east of Sasebo as tropical depression.

10 p.m. Sunday, July 26, Japan time: Halola was downgraded to a tropical depression Sunday evening by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, has already passed Sasebo Naval Base, losing its punch every step of the way. JTWC projects Halola to pass 36 miles northwest of Iwakuni at 5 a.m. Monday, then dissipate Monday evening over Japan’s Kansai region near Kyoto. Expect Sasebo and Iwakuni to issue seasonal Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness 4 in the coming hours. PST will keep an eye on Halola for any signs of regeneration; otherwise, this is PST’s final post regarding Halola.


4:30 p.m. Sunday, July 26, Japan time: Halola continues to rapidly lose its punch as it begins its forecast northeast curve, 22 miles east of Sasebo Naval Base at about 6 p.m. Sunday, carrying sustained 35-mph winds and 46 mph gusts.

Tropical Storm 11W (Nangka), # 42 FINAL UPDATED

Typhoon Nangka is shown in this RGB satellite image taken July 15, 2015.

2:30 p.m. Friday, July 17, Japan time: Nangka has been downgraded to a tropical storm after making landfall over southeastern Shikoku early Friday morning, according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.  Nangka has begun dying out. Once back over the Sea of Japan (East Sea), it should turn rapidly northeast and dissipate southeast of Hokkaido. Tropical Cyclone Condition of Readiness Storm Watch was lifted for Sasebo Naval Base at 9 a.m. and  Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni at 1 p.m.. Unless something changes, this should be the final update on Nangka.


6 p.m. Thursday, July 16, Japan time: Nangka is rapidly losing its power as it tracks north toward projected landfall over southeastern Kyushu about 1 to 2 a.m. Friday. It barely remains a Category 1-equivalent typhoon, 75-mph sustained winds and 92-mph gusts, tracking at 10 mph and now forecast by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center to pass some 97 miles east of Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni around 7 a.m.

 
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About the Author


Dave Ornauer has been with Stars and Stripes since March 5, 1981. One of his first assignments as a beat reporter in the old Japan News Bureau was “typhoon chaser,” a task which he resumed virtually full time since 2004, the year after his job, as a sports writer-photographer, moved to Okinawa and Ornauer with it.

As a typhoon reporter, Ornauer pores over Web sites managed by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center as well as U.S. government, military and local weather outlets for timely, topical information. Pacific Storm Tracker is designed to take the technical lingo published on those sites and simplify it for the average Stripes reader.